Slate-throated Redstart

Location: Machupicchu Pueblo, Peru

Camera Host: Inkaterra Asociación

Both redstart nestlings left the nest on September 16th before 8:11 AM nest time, diving out of view in a flash! Good luck to them as they head out into the cloud forest on their own! Parents will continue to provide food for a few weeks before they become independent. Thanks to our friends at Inkaterra for helping to provide this view!

Find more about Weather in Machu Picchu, PR

September 19, 2017

Slate-throated Redstart Fledging Highlights!

Both Slate-throated Redstart nestlings fledged this past weekend on the morning of Saturday, September 16th! Watch highlights of the young fledglings' last minutes in the nest, including the chicks' final feedings, the nestlings' rocket launch style approach at fledging, and the adult's realization that both the chicks had left the nest.  

September 16, 2017

Redstarts Fledge!

Both redstart nestlings left the nest this morning before 8:11 AM nest time, diving out of view in a flash! Good luck to them as they head out into the cloud forest on their own! Parents will continue to provide food for a few weeks before they become independent. Thanks to our friends at Inkaterra for helping to provide this view! 

September 15, 2017

Join Us For Bird Cams Appreciation Night!

Whether you’re here in Ithaca, New York, or around the world, join the Bird Cams team this Saturday, September 16, as we celebrate the birds, the community, and insights from watching the cams—and anticipate what's yet to come. Join us in person for a reception from 6:00 to 7:00 P.M. and presentation and Q&A from 7:00 to 8:30 at the auditorium in B25 Warren Hall on Cornell campus, or tune in to the live stream from 7:00 to 8:30 P.M., U.S. Eastern Time by clicking on the "More" link.  More...

September 19, 2017

Slate-throated Redstart Fledging Highlights!

Both Slate-throated Redstart nestlings fledged this past weekend on the morning of Saturday, September 16th! Watch highlights of the young fledglings' last minutes in the nest, including the chicks' final feedings, the nestlings' rocket launch style approach at fledging, and the adult's realization that both the chicks had left the nest.  

September 14, 2017

Fledging Approaches For Slate-throated Redstarts

At day 10 post-hatch, the nestlings are likely to make their first venture out of the nest and into the cloud forests of Peru at any time in the next 48 hours! 

September 12, 2017

Slate-throated Redstart Looks Towards Cam After Feeding Nestlings

One of the Slate-throated Redstarts stares down the camera after a short feeding visit to its nestlings. Assuming the nest is successful (open cup nesting birds have about an 80% failure rate in the tropics) only 2–4 days remain until the young birds are scheduled to fledge. 

September 16

Redstarts Fledge!

Both redstart nestlings left the nest this morning before 8:11 AM nest time, diving out of view in a flash! Good luck to them as they head out into the cloud forest on their own! Parents will continue to provide food for a few weeks before they become independent. Thanks to our friends at Inkaterra for helping to provide this view! 

September 04

Redstart Eggs Hatch

Early this morning, biologists at the Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel checked in on the Slate-throated Redstart nest and were excited to see that overnight the young had hatched. Welcome to the world, nestlings! 

The Slate-throated Redstart is the most widespread species in the genus Myioborus, also known as the “whitestarts” as their tail is largely white. It is found from northern Mexico south to northern Bolivia, always in temperate montane habitats. In the north it lives in Pine-Oak forests, farther south in cloud forests and moist montane slopes. It is a species which shows a high degree of geographic variation. In fact this largely grayish-blue bird with a dark chestnut cap has a striking red belly in the north, and in South America (as here on cam in Machu Picchu) it is yellow-bellied, with orange-bellied forms in-between. In studies of Slate-throated Redstarts in the cloud forests of Costa Rica, it took an average of 14 days of incubation before eggs hatched, followed by an average of 11 days until fledging.

The biggest challenge to seeing these birds fledge isn’t even the technical aspect of the cam: it’s the high chance of the nest being predated or failing prior to fledging. Across the tropics, the rate of nest failure in open cup nesting birds can be 80% or higher! This figure holds for Slate-throated Redstart species that have been studied in other locales, and we can’t know whether this particular nest will survive; however, most birds in the tropics cope with this reality by nesting multiple times within the breeding season, and laying fewer eggs per attempt — literally, not putting all of their eggs in one basket! 

Learn more about Slate-throated Redstarts in the Neotropical Birds Online species account.

About the Site

The Slate-throated Redstart cam is situated on the expansive grounds of the Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel in Machupicchu Pueblo, Peru, situated a few thousand feet below the ruins of Machu Picchu.

The small roofed nest is a little under a meter off the ground in a thicket of common ivy that covers a stone wall on the property. In studies of Slate-throated Redstarts in the cloud forests of Costa Rica, it took an average of 14 days of incubation before eggs hatched, followed by an average of 11 days until fledging. As this nest hatched on the morning of September 4, we would expect the young to fledge sometime around September 15.

The biggest challenge to seeing these birds fledge isn’t even the technical aspect of the cam: it’s the high chance of the nest being predated or failing prior to fledging. Across the tropics, the rate of nest failure in open cup nesting birds can be 80% or higher! This figure holds for Slate-throated Redstart species that have been studied in other locales, and we can’t know whether this particular nest will survive; however, most birds in the tropics cope with this reality by nesting multiple times within the breeding season, and laying fewer eggs per attempt — literally, not putting all of their eggs in one basket! 

About the Inkaterra Asociación

Inkaterra Asociación (ITA) is a non-profit institution that started research in 1978 to promote the conservation of Peru’s biodiversity and cultural resources. Committed to sustainable development, its core objectives are the encouragement of scientific research and the promotion of responsible business models to benefit local communities.

Determined to improve the quality of life for every living being, ITA has been able to protect over 15,000 hectares of Amazon rainforest in the low basin of Madre de Dios river (capturing 3,400,000 tons of carbon emissions), as well as ecosystems in Cuzco’s cloud forests. These activities are supported by partnerships with National Geographic Society, Global Environment Facility (United Nations), Conservation International, World Bank, International Game Fish Association, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and other influential organizations.

As intended by the founder of Inkaterra Hotels, José Koechlin von Stein, ITA’s research program is self-funded through its ecotourism activities, which have provided 21 new species for science among orchids, amphibians, insects and liana. An Andean (Spectacled) Bear conservation program in Machu Picchu; bird and orchid studies; and a marine reserve at Cabo Blanco (Northern Peru) stand out among ITA’s current projects.