Panama Fruit Feeders

Location: El Valle de Antón, Panama

Camera Host: Canopy Lodge

May 24, 2018

Rufous Motmot and Buff-throated Saltator Visit Panama Feeders

The Rufous Motmot and Buff-throated Saltator are two of the most striking species that visit the Panama fruit feeder. Watch them visit in succession and nibble on bananas on the feeder platform. 

May 07, 2018

Common Basilisk Snatches Fruit From Panama Feeder

Watch this Common Basilisk quickly pluck fruit as it makes it way across the platform of the Panama fruit feeder.  

April 26, 2018

Thick-billed Euphonias Congregate On Panama Fruit Feeder

Watch and listen as a small group of Thick-billed Euphonias congregate on cam and exchange sweet, burry notes across the feeder platform. Male Thick-billed Euphonias are mainly glossy steel blue with a yellow forecrown patch that reaches to just behind the eye, and bright yellow underparts including the throat. Females are, like those of most euphonias, much duller, being olive above and yellow below. You may also notice a few olive-backed individuals with the signature yellow forecrown of the male birds—these are immature males that have yet to molt into their full adult plumage.  

May 24, 2018

Rufous Motmot and Buff-throated Saltator Visit Panama Feeders

The Rufous Motmot and Buff-throated Saltator are two of the most striking species that visit the Panama fruit feeder. Watch them visit in succession and nibble on bananas on the feeder platform. 

May 07, 2018

Common Basilisk Snatches Fruit From Panama Feeder

Watch this Common Basilisk quickly pluck fruit as it makes it way across the platform of the Panama fruit feeder.  

April 26, 2018

Thick-billed Euphonias Congregate On Panama Fruit Feeder

Watch and listen as a small group of Thick-billed Euphonias congregate on cam and exchange sweet, burry notes across the feeder platform. Male Thick-billed Euphonias are mainly glossy steel blue with a yellow forecrown patch that reaches to just behind the eye, and bright yellow underparts including the throat. Females are, like those of most euphonias, much duller, being olive above and yellow below. You may also notice a few olive-backed individuals with the signature yellow forecrown of the male birds—these are immature males that have yet to molt into their full adult plumage.  

Commonly Seen Species at the Panama Fruit Feeders

Clay-colored Thrush

Clay-colored Thrush

The Clay-colored Thrush is a generally common and easily observed bird, which is found in all manner of lightly wooded areas, often in close proximity to mankind. Its range just reaches the United States, in southernmost Texas, but elsewhere it ranges south through eastern Mexico and over much of Middle America to northwest South America, in Colombia. More

Flame-rumped Tanager (Lemon-rumped)

Flame-rumped Tanager (Lemon-rumped)

Sometimes referred to, equally appropriately, as Yellow-rumped Tanager, this species occurs from western Panama south through Colombia to western Ecuador. Throughout most of its range (except Colombia’s Cauca Valley) the male is velvety black with the exception of the bright lemon-yellow rump and lower back, and have a largely pale bill, whereas the female is blackish brown above with an orange-red rump patch, and yellow below with an orange breast band. Like most other Ramphocelus tanagers this is a sociable bird, being typically found in monospecific flocks, which inhabit shrubby semi-open areas in lowland regions. More

Crimson-backed Tanager

The Crimson-backed Tanager is restricted to the lowlands and valleys of northern Colombia, northwestern Venezuela, and Panama. It closely resembles several other species in the genus Ramphocelus, but no similar species occurs within its range. It is a handsome bird, with scarlet flanks and rump grading into deep velvety crimson head and back. The base of the mandible in the adult male is swollen and brilliant white. Females and young birds are duller dusky red-brown. They travel in noisy flocks in scrub, edge, and secondary growth and are generally common, particularly in areas with human activity. More

Blue-gray Tanager

Blue-gray Tanager

The Blue-gray Tanager is one of the most widespread, and ubiquitous, birds of the humid lowland neotropics. At almost any location between southeastern Mexico and central South America, it is a familiar presence at forest edge, in second-growth, along roads and rivers, in plantations, and even in urban parks and gardens. Blue-gray Tanagers prefer semi-open habitats; they are not found in interior of closed canopy forest, but they can quickly colonize fresh clearings. They are flexible as well in their diet, eating a wide variety of fruit, and also foraging for arthropods. More

Palm Tanager

Palm Tanager

The Palm Tanager is one of the most widespread and familiar birds of humid lowland forests of the neotropics, from Nicaragua south to southern Brazil. Palm Tanagers are common at forest borders, but also occur in the canopy of the interior of forest. Their diet is roughly equally balanced between fruit and arthropods. When foraging, they often cling to the undersides of large leaves, such as to the ends of palm fronds and to Cecropia leaves. Palm Tanagers usually travel in pairs, or in small groups. They often forage apart from other species, but Palm Tanagers also commonly join aggregations of other species at fruiting trees.More

Dusky-faced Tanager

Dusky-faced Tanager

Dusky-faced Tanager is locally fairly common on the Caribbean slope of Central America and in Andean foothills of northwestern South America. They strongly prefer streamside areas, but can be found in other edge zones with shrubby undergrowth. Almost always low in the undergrowth, these tanagers tend to stay under cover in thick vegetation. They travel in noisy single-species groups, only rarely mixing with other species. They forage by pecking and rummaging, and have a habit of flicking their wings and tail. More

Collared Aracari

Collared Aracari

The northernmost of all Pteroglossus, Collared Aracari ranges from central Veracruz, Mexico south through northern Venezuela and western Ecuador. It is a medium-sized fruigivore, found in a variety of wooded habitats including wet lowland primary forest, second growth, forest patches, and plantations of coffee, cacao and fruits, generally below 1000 meters. Collared Aracaris customarily travelin groups of 3 – 10 individuals in the subcanopy and canopy. When flying between fruiting trees or calling they are easily detected, but they can be overlooked when quietly feeding or at the nest. More

Gray-headed Chachalaca

Gray-headed Chachalaca

The Gray-headed Chachalaca is a resident of Central America from Eastern Honduras south to northwest Colombia. Like most species of chachalaca, the Gray-headed Chachalaca is plain in coloration. They are largely arboreal and forage in groups of 6 to 12, only occasionally venturing to the ground. These loud birds have a varied diet consisting of fruits such as the spikes of guarumo trees, guavas and guara fruits as well as leaves and sometimes insects. Inhabitants of tangled thickets and brushy second growth woodland, these birds are common throughout most of their range. More

Spot-crowned Barbet

Spot-crowned Barbet

The Spot-crowned Barbet is found from western Panama to northwest Colombia, with separate subspecies recognized west and east of the Panama Canal Zone. Like all Neotropical barbets, this is a striking-looking bird. The male is mainly black above, with black, yellow and white-patterned underparts. In addition, the female also has the face and throat entirely black. Spot-crowned Barbets inhabit primary forest at low and mid elevations, reaching to 1200 m but usually occurring lower. They forage mainly in the midstory to canopy, taking both fruits and insects, and sometimes forming small bands of up to ten individuals. They are also known to follow army ants, at least occasionally. More

Gray-cowled Wood-rail

Gray-cowled Wood-rail

Gray-cowled Wood-Rail is the most widespread species of Aramides, occurring from southwestern Costa Rica south to northern Argentina. This species primarily occupies swampy forest and forest edge, and the margins of forest streams, and also occurs in mangroves and the edges of marshes. Gray-cowled Wood-Rail usually remain sunder vegetative cover or in thickets, but sometimes ventures out in the open. The diet is mostly invertebrates, but presumably includes small vertebrates such as frogs, and perhaps also seeds, berries, and palm fruits. More

Rufous Motmot

Rufous Motmot

he Rufous Motmot is is the second largest and arguably the most spectacular of the motmots, even though it lacks the bright, iridescent patches of turquoise blue on its head that are characteristic of many other motmot species. The large size, overall rich coloration and contrast between rufous head and underparts and intensely green-blue green back, wings and tail contribute to the striking appearance of this species. The Rufous Motmot prefers humid lowland and hill forest where it consumes a large variety of food items ranging from various fruits to invertebrates and even small vertebrates, sometimes in the company of army ants. When foraging, it is a typical low energy specialist sitting quietly on a shaded horizontal branch for long periods of time from which it suddenly darts out after passing insects. More

Chestnut-headed Oropendola

Chestnut-headed Oropendola

The Chestnut-headed Oropendola is found from Middle America, where it ranges from southeast Mexico south over the Caribbean slope south to South America, as far as northwest Ecuador. Adults are largely black with a chestnut head, rump, and ventral underparts, a yellow tail (except for the dark central feathers), and bright blue eyes. The all-pale bill possesses a noticeable casque and in flight the species appears strikingly long-winged. More

Thick-billed Euphonia

Thick-billed Euphonia

The Thick-billed Euphonia is distributed from Costa Rica south to southern Amazonia. Despite its name, the size of the bill is of extremely limited use in the identification process. The species is mostly found below 1200 m in secondary woodland, forest borders, and scrubby clearings and gardens. It is typically encountered in pairs or small groups, like most euphonias, and often joins mixed-species flocks, especially those dominated by tanagers. Males are mainly glossy steel blue with a yellow forecrown patch that reaches to just behind the eye, and bright yellow underparts including the throat. Females are, like those of most euphonias, much duller, being olive above and yellow below. More

Buff-throated Saltator

Buff-throated Saltator

The Buff-throated Saltator is the English name for the neotropical bird Saltator maximus. The Buff-throated Saltator has a stout, finch-like bill, and traditionally was classified with the cardinals and grosbeaks, Cardinalidae. Recent research reveals that saltators are embedded within the tanager radiation (Thraupidae). Saltators are generally arboreal birds with subdued color patterns and coloration, but usually have a bold superciliary. The Buff-throated Saltator is one of the more widespread members of the genus, and occurs from southern Mexico south to northern Bolivia and southeastern Brazil. More

About the Site

The Panama Fruit Feeder Cam is located on the grounds of the Canopy Lodge in El Valle de Antón, Panama. This site is just over 2,000 ft above sea level in the low mountains of Cerro Gaital, with a mild springtime climate year-round. A small stream called Rio Guayabo runs past the feeders in the background, and the lush landscaping of the Canopy Lodge grounds grade into the forested slopes around them. The feeding table is around 40 feet from the main lodge, and is one of several feeders provisioned throughout the day so that guests to the lodge are greeted to spectacular views of many of the common birds found in this ecosystem (check out the “Species Info” tab for more information on the birds.) Feeders will be filled about every 2 hours beginning at 7 AM till 5PM.

About the Canopy Lodge

The Canopy Lodge is a full service lodge specializing in nature tourism with a focus on birds. It is about 60 miles west of Panama City in the picturesque village of El Valle de Antón, right in the center of the gigantic crater of an extinct volcano. This is the largest inhabited crater in the Western Hemisphere and second only to the Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania. It is surrounded by the Cerro Gaital Natural Monument.

Canopy Lodge is one of a series of three ecotourism ventures developed by the Canopy Family. The first, Canopy Tower, involved transforming a former U.S. radar station overlooking the Panama Canal in Soberanía National Park into a unique birding lodge embedded in the canopy of the surrounding forest. Their newest property, Canopy Camp, offers a taste of some of the wildest lowland rainforest in Panama in the Darién region.

Learn more about the Canopy Family.